Mission:
Increase school library services to students in SDP through equity of access throughout the school day to current and adequate school library programming and resources managed by a certified school librarian.
Goal:
State to the SRC the benefit to students of targeted funding for school library services, including certified librarians, for new and existing Promise Academies and Jackson Elementary School; encourage SRC to target funding for school library programming managed by the certified librarian in a way that principals at the building level will be able to support.

Click to link to:
Map
School Library Reform Proposal 3-9-11
Link Between School Libraries and Student Achievement in the SDP
Economic Benefits of Maximum School Library Services
Fact Sheet--School Libraries in the SDP
21st Century School Library Program
Association of Philadelphia School Librarians information
Letter of support from Dr. Nancy Everhart, President AASL
Press Release 3-11
Press Release Quotes 3-11
Estimated Start-Up Costs for School Libraries
Testimony to SRC 3-9-11
Advocacy Odyssey--Thank you to supporters
APSL--Averette meeting notes 4-8-11
Testimony to SRC 4-13-11
APSL--Averette meeting notes 6/29/11


The following documentation will be provided to the School District of Philadelphia School Reform Commission on March 9, 2011.
The meeting begins at 2:00 p.m., with public comment, including this testimony, estimated to begin about 3:30 p.m.




schlibmap.jpg
Red dots = no certified librarians, green dots = certified librarians Map by J. Malloy, photo by J. Downing


Click here to download a copy of the map. schlibmap.jpg





APSL School Library Reform Proposal

SRC3.jpg
APSL School Library Reform Proposal Supporters 3/9/2011 Photo by J. Malloy


School Library Reform Proposal


The Association of Philadelphia School Librarians is leading a call to action regarding quality school library programs with certified librarians. After sharing the following proposals with many community organizations and receiving their endorsements, APSL believes that the following proposal is very reasonable.
Maintain this year’s 65 certified librarians and provide quality school library programs in existing and new Promise Academies and Jackson Elementary School to boost students’ academic accomplishments in accord with Imagine 2014. This action includes:
1. Targeting funding for adequate and current resources and a certified librarian in each school with clerical help
2. Implementing flexible scheduling--letting students visit the library whenever they need to through out the school day, instead of limiting access to regularly scheduled periods*


3. Library instruction to be co-taught and based upon collaboration with the classroom teacher
4. Providing a minimum of 30 library computers less than 4 years old, with Internet access and digital resources to include state-provided ACCESS PA and POWER Library databases
5. Providing a collection of at least 30 library books per student with the annual addition of one book per student in K–8 and .5 books per student in high school
Quality school library programs provide unequaled return on investment; directly affect students' achievement; are proven through research to increase test scores of low-income students; provide equity for low-income students to technology and digital media and instruction in its use; encourage literacy from the youngest ages with resources that are available to every student in each school all day long.
Quality school library programs are a proven best practice in closing the achievement gap and providing students with the critical thinking and problem-solving skills they need to be career and college-ready for the 21st century. Every student deserves this opportunity to learn, this “promise” of a quality school library program.
Carol Heinsdorf, President
Association of Philadelphia School Librarians

Dr. Nancy Everhart, President
American Association of School Librarians (AASL)

Eileen Kern, Vice President/President-Elect
Pennsylvania School Library Association (PSLA)

Brenda Maiden, President
Pennsylvania African-American Library Association (PAALA)

Baruch Kintisch, Director of Policy Advocacy
Education Law Center
Philadelphia, PA

Jerry Jordan, President
Philadelphia Federation of Teachers

Brian Armstead, Director of Civic Engagement
Philadelphia Education Fund

D. William Browning Legislative/Education Director
ACTION United
Philadelphia, PA

Thoai Nguyen, Executive Director
SEAMAAC, Inc.
Philadelphia, PA

Edurne Irizarry, Assistant Director
Youth United for Change
Philadelphia, PA

Zac Steele, Director
JUNTOS
Philadelphia, PA

Jennifer Zanck, Education Committee Co-Chair
Passyunk Square Civic Association
Philadelphia, PA

Joyce Valenza, Ph.D.
Springfield, PA

Delia Neuman, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Director of the School Library Media Program
College of Information Science and Technology, Drexel University
Philadelphia, PA

Raymond W. Barber, Ph.D.
Editor, Senior High School Core Collection/Special Consultant
H. W. Wilson Company

Alexia Hudson, MLIS
Reference & Instruction Librarian
Penn State Abington

Keith Curry Lance
Consultant, RSL Research Group
Denver, CO

Jamieson McKenzie, Editor
From Now On - http://fno.org
Bellingham, WA

Pat Kindermann, President
Embracing the Child
Bedford, VA

Joan Sage, Presenter
The Whimsical Sage Read-Aloud
Philadelphia, PA


*http://www.wallacefoundation.org/KnowledgeCenter/KnowledgeTopics/AreasOfContinuingInterest/Libraries/Pages/LibraryPowerES.aspx
Pa Guidelines for School Library Programs (c2005) http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/gateway/PTARGS_0_123484_699823_0_0_18/PA_Guidelines_School_Lib_Programs_2005.pdf




The Link between School Libraries and Student Achievement

SAT-9 Results Improvement**
The School District of Philadelphia Research and Evaluation Department made several conclusions in 1998 based on results of the standardized SAT-9 test regarding quality school library programming, referred to as Library Power, which included a certified school librarian.
  • [O]f the 66 comparisons across the four grades (each of the 33 Library Power schools had two grades with SAT-9 data), 44 showed a higher than expected score for the Library Power schools.
  • [A]s the grade level increased, so did the number of Library Power schools scoring higher than expected.
  • [T]here was a significant interaction between poverty level and difference from the expected achievement level for the Library Power schools; student[s] in higher poverty Library Power schools scored higher than expected.
Therefore, research conducted in the School District of Philadelphia has proven that quality school library programs significantly benefit our low-income children's academic achievement.

High Financial Return on Investment
The principal at Roberto Clemente Middle School invested up to $9000 annually in school library resources for 9 years. In the 2005-2006 school year, student use of the resources was over $463,000! This remarkable school library ROI directly affects students' ability to perform academically and is an excellent investment for a school district struggling with limited financial resources.





[The following graphs were not a part of the SRC documentation, but are included here for clairity and visual edification.]
Pat's_copy.jpg
Pat's_copy2.jpg

Pat's_copy3.jpg





PSSA Results Improvement
School library staffing is correlated with [PSSA] scores; as library staffing rises, reading scores rise. [PSSA reading scores rise 10 to 15 points when all library predictors are maximized.] This correlation is not explained away by other school conditions, such as per pupil expenditures by school or the teacher-pupil ration. Likewise, the relationship is not explained away by community conditions, such as poverty and low adult educational attainment. Several characteristics of school library programs beyond staffing help to explain the relationship between library staffing and academic achievement. These characteristics include: school library expenditures; information resources; information technology; and staff activities that help to integrate information literacy into the school's approaches to standards and curricula.
Speaker's Journal. Volume 6.13. Spring 2007. (c) The Pennsylvania House of Representatives ISBN 0-966794-4-4


Testimonials


  • After only three years of service from a certified school librarian where there had been none before, 11th graders at Swenson Arts and Technology High School made AYP for the first time in 2007, and have continued to do so in reading ever since.

  • After only three years of service from a certified school librarian where there had been none before, J. Hampton Moore Elementary School made AYP for the first time in 2010.

  • The Teen Writers Guild at Frankford High School had two books of essays, poems and stories published, What We Want to Tell You, c. 2006 and The Writings on the Wall, c. 2007, resulting in several college scholarships, through the collaborative teaching efforts of Philadelphia author Ms. Judith Kristen (Purple Hat Gang, c. 2004) and Mrs. Magna Diaz, certified librarian.

  • Joyce Valenza is the certified librarian at Springfield High School in Montgomery County, PA, just outside the Philadelphia city limits. She is nationally recognized as a 21st century librarian managing a 21st century school library facility. In 2009, when a Germantown High School student visited and observed Dr. Valenza's library, resources and student activity, he turned to one of the chaperones to say, "I will never be able to compete with these students in college."

** Offenberg, R. M. & Clark, T. J. [02/19/99 Sch Dist Phila Res&Eval]. Impact on Student Achievement As Measured By The Stanford Achievement Test, 9th Edition, 2. Retrieved 9/12/2010 from http://apsl.wikispaces.com/Offenberg+and+Clark+1998
Lance, K. C., Rodney, M. J. & Hamilton-Pennell, C. (2000). Measuring Up to Standards Findings: The Impact of School Library Programs & Information Literacy in Pennsylvania Schools. (Eric Record Details ED446770). Retrieved 12/28/2010, from http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmi ni.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=ED 446770&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=ED44 6770

More information about the impact school library programming has on student achievement can be found at
http://library.mansfield.edu/impact.asp


Fact Sheet: School Libraries in Philadelphia

Revisions to numbers of certified librarians, as of June 30, 2013:

Of 43 certified librarians, 13 retired, 8 laid off

Revisions to numbers of certified librarians teaching as of September 1, 2013:

16 certified librarians teaching in elementary schools

4 certified librarians teaching in other areas of certification

No certified librarians teaching in HSs

October, 2013--certified librarian returned to each of Masterman and Central HSs due to $205,000 gift to SDP from anonymous donor, leaving 2 elementary schools without certified librarians that had them in September.


¾ of schools in the School District of Philadelphia do not have a library staffed by a certified school librarian.


In approximately 30 elementary schools with a certified librarian, most students do not have access to the library resources or the certified librarian more than once a week for a maximum of forty-five minutes.


In the 2010-2011 school year, 63 certified librarians serve the students of the School District of Philadelphia, in a total of 257 schools (25%). The number of certified librarians in 1991 was 176, in a total of 259 schools (68%)


As of January 5, 2011, the following percentages of schools did NOT have a certified librarian:

High Schools 30 of 61 (49%)


Middle Schools 23 of 29 (79%)


Elementary Schools 145 of 171 (85%)


The areas of Philadelphia that have fewest certified librarians in schools are the areas formerly known as these regions: South, Central, Central East, West, and Northwest. The former region that has the most certified librarians is the Northeast.

Dr. Lori Shorr, Philadelphia's Chief Education Officer, wrote Agreeing on What Matters: Efforts to Align Standards, Curriculum, and Assessment in Philadelphia from Pre-School through College. Dr. Shorr states that for a student to become an effective writer, the student must be able to "Search for and evaluate research material in various forms, cite sources, and understand why bibliographic references are important," all academic skills best taught by a certified librarians in the school library.






21st Century School Library Program

A 21st century school library program is unique in the fabric of an outstanding school in its methods of preparing students for the future. A quality school library program teaches the life skills of critical thinking; evaluation and ethical use of information; reading in all formats using digital downloads, mobile devices, varied Internet sources and books; responsible use of social media and emerging technological tools; and independent and collaborative student production of work for a real audience.
The quality school library program provides equity to these traditional and new resources to every student in the school through open access throughout the school day.
The 21st century librarian is the manager, providing visionary service and instruction through caring and helpful relationships with both students and teachers. He or she makes decisions for the greater good in a complex technological world modeling the higher order thinking skills of evaluation, analysis, and synthesis for students and teachers.
The school library managed by a certified school librarian stands alone in its ability among all school resources to promote academic rigor, thoughtful inquiry, and high expectations in support of teachers and students, while guaranteeing each student's preparation for lifetime engagement in intellectual freedom.
A quality school library program as described above, IN EVERY SCHOOL, is non-negotiable for students in the school District of Philadelphia.


Adapted with permission of the author.
Valenza, J. K. (10/10) Manifesto for 21st Century School Librarians. Retrieved 12/12/10 <http://informationfluency.wikispaces.com/You+know+you%27re+a+21st+century+librarian+if+.+.+.>




The Association of Philadelphia School Librarians

The Association of Philadelphia School Librarians (APSL) was founded as a social organization in the 1970s by librarians in the School District of Philadelphia. Since that time, its membership has expanded to include librarians from Philadelphia public, private, parochial and charter schools, the iSchool at Drexel University, the Free Library of Philadelphia, and library staffers and friends of the school library community. APSL provides networking opportunities for its members. As an advocacy organization, it promotes dynamic school library programs for the benefit of students in the School District of Philadelphia. These initiatives focus upon having either central funding or line items in the budget of every school for a certified librarian with clerical help, and current and adequate print and digital resources for students.

Our Mission

We seek to promote the development of quality library service to the students of Philadelphia and the interests of its members; to compare and exchange ideas; and to unite the endeavors of the professional librarians to promote legislative, civic, and educational, technological, and social measures in the development of libraries.

Our Vision

As 21st century learners, each student in the School District of Philadelphia, from the youngest child in kindergarten to the senior anticipating commencement, deserves access to a quality school library program.
Officers
Carol Heinsdorf, President
cheinsdorf@gmail.com







Janet Malloy, Vice President
jsmalloy@comcast.net







Bernadette Cooke-Kearney, Recording Secretary
Brenda Maiden, Assistant Treasurer
Tamara Friend, Secretary
Magna Diaz, Corresponding Secretary
magnadiaz@comcast.net







Jayne Downing, Membership Chair





American Association of School Librarians
a division of the American Library Association
50 E. Huron Street
Chicago, IL 60611

Dear School Reform Commission:
I am writing in support of the Association of Philadelphia School Librarians call to action for quality school library programs in existing and new Promise Academies, supported with targeted funding from the School District of Philadelphia. Certified school librarians in quality school libraries provide equal access for all students to the shared resources and instruction crucial for students to learn and thrive in the 21st century.
A certified school librarian is absolutely essential to making the school library program a dynamic learning center where students are given instruction in multiple literacies including information literacy, technology skills, critical thinking and problem-solving. School librarians work closely with classroom teachers to design and deliver effective instruction that integrates subject content with these skills. With the help of a certified school librarian, students learn to maneuver through a vast world of information while practicing safety and applying ethical standards to their research and sharing what they have learned.
School librarians provide up-to-date, relevant and enticing books that encourage students to read. Students who have access to a wide range of reading materials with plenty of time to read not only become better readers but become life-long readers.
The library program is at the center of learning in a school. I sincerely hope the decision- makers of Philadelphia will continue to provide students with library programs in each school led by a certified school librarian. Library programs provide learning opportunities available to students and decrease the growing digital and literacy divide. Certified librarians, who excite students to read and teach a variety of 21st century skills, are an investment in the success of our children. I am hoping that you find the means to make a difference for the future of all your students, future wage earners, and future informed citizens by employing the library staff and in turn the library programs. Please let me know if I can provide you with more information to assist you.

Dr. Nancy Everhart, President
American Association of School Librarians





PRESS RELEASE--FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
apslogo.jpg
Contact: Janet Malloy, Executive Board member
Association of Philadelphia School Librarians
email: jsmalloyatcomcastdotnet

LIBRARY SUPPORTERS FIGHT FOR CRUCIAL RESOURCES TO SUPPORT PHILADELPHIA STUDENTS

Dr. Ackerman's Imagine 2014 listed "Libraries in all high schools" (p.29) as a contributing factor to student success.
However, there are currently only 65 certified librarians in the School District of Philadelphia, with 257 schools. Thirty-one high schools have certified librarians; thirty do not (49%).

With the Offenberg and Clark study proving that school library programming managed by a certified school librarian increases test scores among low income students, Carol Heinsdorf, President of the Association of Philadelphia School Librarians, will be testifying to the School Reform Commission on Wednesday, March 9, making the case for library programming to be managed by certified librarians in new and existing Promise Academies.

"Struggling low-income students in new and existing Promise Academies need equitable access to quality school library resources. Certified librarians can help them to achieve academic success in research, critical thinking and responsible and ethical use of digital media. Of 16 Promise Academies, only 5 have certified school librarians.
"Without certified librarians, the academic aspirations of these Promise Academies will face significant challenges and will not achieve their highest potential.” commented Carol Heinsdorf.

The School District of Philadelphia is facing a budget shortfall. Quality school library programs are an excellent Return On Investment. For example, $80,000 invested in the Clemente Middle School Library over 9 years resulted in $463,000 of use by students in the ninth year.


New and existing Promise Academies with certified school librarians are Potter-Thomas, Clemente Middle School, Germantown HS, South Philadelphia HS, and University City HS. New and existing Promise Academies without certified school librarians are Alcorn, Barry, Pennell, Smith, W.D. Kelley, Ethel Allen, Dunbar, FitzSimons HS, Sayre HS, West Philadelphia HS and Vaux HS.
###




Press Release Quotes:

“School libraries teach students to be resourceful when exploring ideas and information, integrating all subject areas. Without school libraries we prevent students from improving their reading comprehension and writing skills, we miss an important opportunity to teach students to be wise consumers of media, and deny them the promise of student achievement.”
Aleea S. Slappy
Parents in Action Organizer
The Enterprise Center CDC
West Philadelphia

“The VIP Daycare Center offers before and after school care, but we don’t have a certified librarian on staff. We are dependent on the schools in this North Philadelphia neighborhood to provide adequate library resources that are current, with certified teacher librarians.”
Gwynn Gaines, Director of VIP Daycare Center
North Philadelphia

“This neighborhood does not have a public library. How will the students here progress if the schools do not offer libraries with certified librarians and up-to-date materials and equipment?”
Seymour Berrian, Chairman of the Deacons’ Ministry
Second Antioch Baptist Church
West Philadelphia

There simply can't be any discussion or plan to reform schools without making a part of those discussions and plans a quality library in each school. Our students deserve adequate library books, research materials, technology, and a certified librarian, with funds designated for the support and operation of that library. To educate students to compete and thrive in this global economy, schools must provide this invaluable resource, where students can gather, research, explore and study on a daily basis.
Tammy Pullins, Member
Germantown High School Community Partners Group

“School library programs are in investment in closing the achievement gap of learners, providing an equitable, fiscally responsible strategy for sharing resources across grade levels and the curriculum while addressing core reading, information, and technology literacies. While students represent 25 percent of our state’s population; they are 100 percent of our future. All students deserve the chance to learn with the resources and instructional services that school libraries with certified librarians provide.”
Debra E. Kachel
Instructor & Scholarship Director
School Library & Information Technologies Graduate School
Mansfield University, Mansfield, PA






Total estimated start-up costs for libraries in schools with 500 students 4/11:
Elementary School $432,115
High School $397,115

BREAK DOWN--
Staffing:
SDP annual budget allotment for school librarian = $ 93,600 (2009-2010)
SDP annual budget allotment for Library Instructional Media Assistant (LIMA/clerk)= $ 54,400 (2009-2010)

Start-up library book collection for a school with 500 students:
Ed Ebert, Follett consultant 888.511.5114 x 3718
(Appropriate shelving and seating is assumed.)

Elementary school:
500 students X 20 books per students = 10,000 books
10,000 books X $23.00 per book (including processing) = $230,000

High school:
500 students X 15 books per students = 7,500 books
7,500 books X $26.00 per book (including processing) = $195,000

AccessPA/POWER Library (estimated $40,000 package) annual cost (PA subsidized) = $230.00
PLUS any other electronic subscriptions.

Technology start-up:
Circulation computer, librarian's laptop, smartboard with projector, and either laptop lab with cart or desktop lab. (Assumed are computer tables and chairs and wireless connectivity.)
Sources: http://webgui.phila.k12.pa.us/offices/e/etg/policies--procedures/price-lists, viewed 3/8/2011

Circulation computer:
21.5–inch iMac Upgrade Option 2
Commodity Code: 20300100015
Apple Part # SDPD4LL/A
Price $2,059.00

Laptop for librarian:
21.5–inch iMac Upgrade Option 1
Commodity Code: 20300100012
Apple Part # SDPD3LL/A
Price $1,599.00

Smartboard and projector:
SMART SBD685
Dual Touch SMART Board SB685 (16:10 wide format)
$1,309.60
EPSON Powerlite 450W
Epson ULTRA Short Throw Projector; (16:10 wide format); WXGA; 2500 lumens - Includes projector mount and 3 year warranty
$1,247.00

Laptop lab with cart:
13.3–inch MacBook (laptop)
Commodity Code: 20300100111
Apple Part # SDPMB2LL/A
Price $1,390.00 X 33 = $45,870
Bretford Mobility Cart (30)
Apple Part #TX323LL/A
Price: $1799.95
Comm Code:20310

OR
Desktop lab:
21.5–inch iMac (desktop)
Commodity Code: 20300100011
Apple Part # SDPD2LL/A
Price $1,379.00 X 33 = $45,507

Totals for technology start-up:
Desktop circulation computer, librarian's laptop, smart board with projector and laptops with cart = $53,885
Desktop circulation computer, librarian's laptop, smart board with projector and desktop computers = $51,722
###




Testimony to School Reform Commission March 9, 2011

Members of the SRC and Dr. Ackerman-
I am Carol Heinsdorf, President of the Association of Philadelphia School Librarians, known as APSL, which has been advocating for quality school library programming and certified school librarians for 40 years. I am joined today by citizens of Philadelphia and the state of Pennsylvania, as well as others in spirit from across the U.S. whose signatures appear below this testimony.
This year, there are 65 certified librarians in the SDP with 257 schools. In 1991, there were 176 certified librarians with 259 schools. Schools have stayed constant, but certified librarians have decreased by 60% so that three quarters of schools now do not have them. To level our students' academic playing field, equity of access throughout the school day to a certified librarian and current and adequate school library resources is necessary.
APSL met with many community organizations over the last several months. We developed the following proposals with them, have received their official endorsements, and believe that the following is very reasonable.
First, maintain this year’s 65 certified librarians.
Secondly, in the new and existing Promise Academies and Jackson Elementary School, include the following to boost students’ academic accomplishments in accord with Imagine 2014.
· Targeted funding for adequate and current resources, and a certified librarian in each school with clerical help
· Implement flexible scheduling--let students visit the library whenever they need to throughout the day instead of limiting use to regularly scheduled periods
· Library instruction is to be co-taught and based upon collaboration with the classroom teacher
· Provide a minimum of 30 library computers less than 4 years old, with Internet access and digital resources to include state-provided ACCESS PA and POWER Library databases
· Provide at least 30 library books per student with the annual addition of one book per student in K–8 and .5 books per student in high school
The national and local organizations that have officially endorsed this proposal are:
American Association of School Librarians--a division of the American Library Association
Pennsylvania School Library Association
Pennsylvania African-American Library Association
Philadelphia Federation of Teachers
Education Law Center
Philadelphia Education Fund

Youth United for Change
JUNTOS
Passyunk Square Civic Association
SEAMAAC, Inc.
ACTION United
Dr. Joyce Valenza
Dr. Delia Neuman, iSchool, Drexel University
Keith Lance, RSL Research Group
Jamie McKenzie, Editor, From Now On, online educational technology journal
Dr. Raymond Barber, Wilson
Alexia Hudson, MLIS

Pat Kindermann, Embracing the Child
Joan Sage, Whimsical Sage Reading Program
Quality school library programs are a proven best practice in closing the achievement gap for Philadelphia’s low income students and providing them with the critical thinking and problem-solving skills they need to be career and college-ready for the 21st century. Each of our students deserves this opportunity to learn, this “promise” of a quality school library program.
Included in my printed testimony are three examples of the importance of school libraries. They are the Offenberg and Clark study, which says that low income students in the SDP benefit from quality school library programs; the Clemente Middle School Library Return on Investment, showing that a modest annual investment in school library resources over nine years resulted in almost a half million dollars worth of use by students themselves;
and the Germantown High School student who visited Dr. Valenza's Springfield High School Library in Montgomery County and stated to his chaperone, "I will never be able to compete with these students in college."
My only request today is that I have a chance to meet with the District and the SRC to discuss implementation of this proposal so that I can come back to the next the next SRC meeting to report positive results.
Thank you.




An Advocacy Odyssey--Many thanks to all
Carol W. Heinsdorf, President

Association of Philadelphia School Librarians


The following narrative describes in detail the advocacy efforts of the Association of Philadelphia School Librarians from June 2010 through March 9, 2011.
The Association of Philadelphia School Librarians’ (APSL) testimony to the School Reform Commission (SRC) of the School District of Philadelphia (SDP) took place on March 9, 2011. The thrust of the testimony included first, retention of the 65 certified librarians currently working in the SDP; secondly, implementation of five key components for quality school library programming in new and existing Promise Academies. Promise Academies are consistently poorly performing schools that remain in the SDP with additional funding, longer school days, twice a month Saturday morning classes, and revised teaching staffs. They are the direct recipients of the attention of District Superintendent Dr. Arlene Ackerman; their test scores are of particular importance to her. The five key components are:
1. Targeted funding for adequate and current resources and a certified librarian in each school with clerical help
2. Implementation of flexible scheduling--allowing students to visit the library whenever they need to throughout the school day, instead of limiting access to regularly scheduled periods
3. Library instruction to be co-taught and based upon collaboration with the classroom teacher
4. Provide a minimum of 30 library computers less than 4 years old, with Internet access and digital resources to include state-provided ACCESS PA and POWER Library databases
5. Provide a collection of at least 30 library books per student (see Guidelines) with the annual addition of one book per student in K–8 and .5 books per student in high school
This testimony was also the culmination of work by APSL and its supporters for the last twenty years. At that time, librarian Donna Koslowski, now retired from the SDP, had started to keep records of which schools had fully functioning libraries and which did not.

Laying the Groundwork
Four years ago, when Janet Malloy became APSL president, our membership instituted advocacy efforts to awaken the city to the declining public school library situation, contacting news sources and City Council members, making a lot of noise but achieving little success. In June, 2010, Deb Kachel, Pennsylvania School Librarians Association (PSLA) Legislation Co-Chairperson, connected Mrs. Malloy (now APSL’s vice president) and me (now president) to Baruch Kintisch, Director of Policy Advocacy, Education Law Center (ELC) here in Philadelphia. Collaboration with the ELC was a natural fit because inequity of access to school libraries is an issue for so many students. With Mr. Kintisch’s encouragement, direction, and support, APSL’s advocacy efforts became more focused, including selecting a reasonable number of school libraries for improvement and developing relationships with other non-profit community organizations.
In August, 2010 at the ELC, a morning meeting was called and guided by Mr. Kintisch and attended by several other members of the ELC as well as Lauren Jacobs, Coordinator, Cross City Campaign for School Reform and Brian Armstead, Director of Civic Engagement, Philadelphia Education Fund (PEF). Mrs. Malloy and I attended, along with Margaret Plotkin, APSL Board member, Jayne Downing, APSL membership chair, and Martha Kroch, APSL clerical library staff liaison. It was there that we met Connie Sung, also of the ELC, who became our immediate advisor and information booklet editor. A strategy was initiated; clear documentation was encouraged and community organizations with which to collaborate were identified. At the invitation of Mr. Armstead, Deborah Grill, SDP librarian retiree, became our daytime volunteer liaison to the monthly Education First Compact meetings, a diverse group of education stakeholders committed to improving public education in Philadelphia. Her attendance there led to our meeting with Public Citizens for Children and Youth (PCCY) at the behest of Aleea S. Slappy, Parents in Action Organizer, The Enterprise Center CDC, West Philadelphia, who later provided a quote for the APSL press release.
The ELC meeting was followed that morning by one with Jerry Jordan, president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers (PFT). Mrs. Malloy had created “Dottie” a huge, stiff three foot by four foot map delineating the library situation in every SDP school. Green dots indicate schools with certified librarians; red dots indicate schools without certified librarians. The red dots are overwhelming. So, comically, two very tall lawyers, Mr. Kintisch and David Lapp, “Dottie,” and I sandwiched ourselves into Mrs. Kroch’s compact car with her behind the wheel for the short ride to the PFT office.
Mr. Jordan dispensed sage advice. He suggested that we focus upon Promise Academies. Mr. Jordan repeated several times that “Timing is everything.” Because the budget is in place for the following school year by April, his advice was heeded; APSL’s testimony was scheduled for early March, 2011.
Because we were separating after the meeting to take public transportation to our next destinations, I requested of Mr. Jordan that “Dottie” be left safely in his office, to be picked up later. He kindly obliged, and it was left propped up prominently.
Media Event
About a month later, with “Dottie” still at the PFT office, I received a telephone call from Barbara Goodman, Communications Director for the PFT. The red dots on the map having generated much attention, she arranged a press conference for Mr. Jordan in November, 2010 around the topic of the lack of certified librarians and quality school library programs in the SDP. The event was held in the library of Promise Academy University City High School, where Mrs. Julie Davis is librarian and APSL’s community liaison to the Philadelphia Student Union. At this press event, attended by a phalanx of APSL members, with one of the local television stations filming, Mr. Jordan compared the dearth of SDP school library services to the very well-funded prison libraries, noting that only professional librarians, persons holding master’s degrees in the field, were qualified to staff prison libraries. Dafney Tales, a reporter from the Philadelphia Daily News, attended and published an article. News items were heard on the radio, as well.
That same month, due to election of a new governor and state administration, the PFT called a general membership meeting to discuss potential consequences for SDP schools. When the microphone opened for comment, I stepped up to publicly thank Mr. Jordan for his guidance and press conference in support of school libraries. I noted that there were 9 librarians in attendance, more than 10% [actually, more than 20%] of all 65 SDP certified librarians. ClaireAgnes Doermann, Ms. Downing, Brenda Maiden, Mrs. Malloy, Deborah Mullin, Brooks Rolston, Sharon Sherman and Margaret Tatro all made the effort to attend the meeting on a school night.
In February, 2011, evening meetings were attended by many APSL members in response to the SDP’s invitation regarding the Facilities Master Plan—Caroliese Reed, Ms. Mullin, Phyllis Hayes, Tina Weinraub, Mrs. Tatro, Mrs. Maiden, Linda Esh, Ms. Grill, Mrs. Malloy and I. As a result of this collective action, school libraries moved from eighth place on the facilities “must-have” list to third place. Also, I connected with Tammy Pullins, a member of the Germantown High School Community Partners Group who is very concerned about the quality of that high school library facility and resources in the school, who later contributed a quote to the press packet.

Endorsements
In January, Mrs. Malloy and I had begun to meet with community organizations. Mr. Kintisch at the ELC recommended those with which he thought we would be most successful. Our purpose was to find areas of common concern, explain our proposal and then ask for their endorsement. We were successful.
Edurne Irizarry, Assistant Director at Youth United for Change affiliated with Mastbaum Vocational Technical High School, endorsed the proposal, incorporated school libraries into a platform document prepared by her organization and encouraged her students to stand behind me when I testified. I have since been invited to speak to her students, thus providing an opportunity to encourage her young people to advocate for school libraries for themselves, and their children when they become parents.
Thoai Nguyen, Executive Director of Southeast Asian Mutual Assistant Association Coalition, Inc., (SEAMAAC) was another endorser. Not only did Mr. Nguyen endorse the proposal, he suggested and instructed us in creating a press packet that he edited and distributed, and brought several officers from SEAMAAC to stand behind the podium during testimony. They were Mr. Yohanes Sulistiyono, Community Organizer; Ms. Elsina Amedova, Finance Coordinator; and Mr. Nguyen Ho, HR Coordinator, among others. Having advised us also to make badges, a grass roots strategy, Mr. Nguyen finished the job of distributing them at the SRC meeting, 80 badges in all.
Mrs. Malloy and I visited with Zac Steele, Director of JUNTOS, an organization in South Philadelphia helping young Mexican immigrant families, many employed in the restaurant industry. He mentioned the desire of parents in the community for a certified librarian in the Jackson Elementary School, where there is a nascent library. Jennifer Zanck, Education Committee Co-Chair of the Passyunk Square Civic Association (PSCA), confirmed that via email, leading to Jackson being added to the list of schools in the proposal. JUNTOS and PSCA became endorsers.
When Mrs. Kachel was notified of APSL’s efforts, she immediately contacted Dr. Nancy Everhart, president of the American Association of School Librarians (AASL), boldly asking her to appear to stand with us during testimony. Although Dr. Everhart’s schedule did not permit that, she emailed a letter on AASL letterhead supporting the proposal, which was printed out and added to the information booklet. Eileen Kern, President Elect of PSLA, was not able to attend, but endorsed the proposal, as did Brenda Maiden, President of the Pennsylvania African-American Library Association (PAALA).
Mr. Armstrong, who attended our initial August meeting at the ELC and had helped to focus our documentation, provided endorsement as Director of Civic Engagement for PEF, as did D. William Browning, Legislative/Education Director of ACTION United in North Philadelphia.
Joyce Valenza, Ph.D., kindly gave permission to include in the information booklet an adaptation of her Manifesto for the 21st Century School Librarian. It is necessary to acquaint our School District leadership with language that reflects today’s school library programming and service at its best, where student learning and responsible inquiry are the foci, that language moving us far beyond the antiquated perception of school librarians as merely book stampers. Although she was not able to attend the SRC meeting (even library technology gurus need to put their cars in the shop sometimes), Dr. Valenza had already provided two important points for the proposal, plus her endorsement. Delia Neuman, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Director of the School Library Media Program at Drexel University’s iSchool, Dr. Raymond W. Barber, Editor Senior High School Core Collection and Special Consultant, H. W. Wilson Company, and Alexia Hudson, Reference and Instruction Librarian at Penn State University, Ambler Campus and a member of PAALA, also endorsed the proposal.
Keith Curry Lance, Consultant, RSL Research Group, authored Measuring Up to Standards Findings: The Impact of School Library Programs and Information Literacy in Pennsylvania Schools. That was footnoted on the information packet page, “The Link Between School Libraries and Student Achievement.” As a contributor to our project, I requested his endorsement, which he graciously gave. Jamie McKenzie, editor of the on-line journal From Now On, who has written extensively in support of school libraries, signed on as well.
Mrs. Pat Kindermann, president of Embracing the Child, an organization that provides books to at-risk children and has provided hundreds of Townsend Press Bluford series titles for my students in detention, was pleased to be included on the endorsement list, as was Joan Sage, a presenter of the The Whimsical Sage Read-Aloud Program at a PSLA conference and in schools throughout the Philadelphia area.

Information Packet
The School Library Reform Proposal had been a draft during our visits and email exchanges with potential endorsers, inviting their input. Deb Weiner, Education Committee Chair of PCCY, made important observations and suggestions regarding the original wording for the funding, and Mr. Armstead, PEF, suggested some editing for clarity.
So, our information packet was written and re-written, with Ms. Sung editing and formatting. Ms. Downing’s photograph of “Dottie” graces the cover of the packet, followed by the five key components on the first page. Keith Lance suggested via email that the second page, “Why Care About School Libraries?” be provided a more recent citation (click on Scholastic School Libraries Work - Compendium of State Studies). On page three, entitled “The Link Between School Libraries and Student Achievement,” Bruce Stern, SDP Technology Teacher Leader, had scanned the Offenberg and Clark study so that it could be referred to for SAT-9 test improvement; Sam Jackendoff, Curriculum Supervisor for Library and Information Sciences, Pittsburgh Public Schools, had put in a late on-line evening, helping me to determine the Return on Investment of my former middle school library collection when Ms. Pat Mazzuca, now Assistant Superintendent for Elementary Education SDP, had been my library-supportive principal; and Mr. Lance’s Measuring Up to Standards Findings contributed the Pennsylvania System of School Assessment results improvement. Susan Hall-Pinzini, Magna Diaz, and Mrs. Malloy contributed testimonials, with information about Dr. Valenza’s Springfield High School library provided by Ms. Grill. Ms. Koslowski’s now-historical data featured prominently on the “Fact Sheet: School Libraries in Philadelphia” in the latest comparisons of library programs over time. The current SDP certified librarian data was accurate as of 12/2010 because it had been requested using the Right to Know law form. Ms. Weiner, PCCY, provided the study by Dr. Lori Shorr, now Mayor Nutter’s Chief Education Officer, which describes the activities of school librarians in reference to preparing students to write and be college-ready. The information packet is completed with the adaptation of Dr. Valenza's Manifesto, as noted earlier; a brief history of APSL and officers' contact information; the letter of endorsement from Dr. Everhart; and a copy of the Pennsylvania PTA Position Statement on Public School Library Programs.
In anticipation of the budget process, early in January, 2011 at the APSL Board meeting held in Mrs. Maiden's Carver High School of Engineering and Science library, Board members put together an inter-school mailing to every principal. It consisted of a copy of Scholastic's latest edition of School Libraries Work! with a cover letter that was the adaptation of Dr. Valenza's Manifesto, the above referenced page in our information booklet. Over 250 envelopes were stuffed by Mrs. Maiden, Mrs. Malloy, Mrs. Essilfie, Ms. Davis, Ms. Doermann, Mrs. Esh, and Mrs. Tatro, with the hope that the information contained therein might inform principals to the benefit of school libraries with certified librarians.

Contacts
In the last week before the testimony date, I had a telephone conversation with Francisco Durán, Assistant Superintendent, SDP Promise Academy Office and, accompanied by my steadfast supporter Mrs. Malloy, a visit with Joseph Dworetsky, member of the SRC. Rachelle Nocito, Content Specialist for Libraries, and Lois McGee, Director of Integrated Instruction, received emails. The purpose of these contacts was to alert them to the impending testimony, to avert any “surprises.” All were gracious in their responses. Mr. Dworetsky had a question about the start-up cost of a school library, so the night before the SRC meeting, I thought I would take 15 minutes to answer his question. Three hours later, with a late evening phone conversation with Ed Ebert, Follett Library Resources Consultant, the email with the information was ready to send, and off it went!

Testimony
Mrs. Malloy and I both took a half-day of personal leave for the afternoon of the testimony. We had carpooled for our community visits, but drove to the School Board building separately that day. I arrived very early, staked out my seat, and even had time to go to the podium to practice my three minute speech one more time, alone in the auditorium. The meeting started at 2 p.m., making attendance by working parents and teachers very difficult, if not impossible. I hoped that perhaps I might have six people standing behind me when I spoke.
Mrs. Malloy arrived. We gave out what badges we could to other early attendees, many wearing them, others refusing the badges outright, some taking them and then giving them back. As I had been advised, I scouted out the location in the auditorium where the reporters would sit, near the electrical outlets for their computers. Mrs. Malloy and I gave out the press packets and spoke to as many reporters as we could. The press packets included a press release highlighting the points of the proposal and naming the Promise Academies that had and needed certified librarians. It also included a page of quotes about the importance of school libraries. An additional two quotes had been garnered by retired librarian Janice Berrian from Seymour Berrian, Chairman of the Deacons’ Ministry, Second Antioch Baptist Church, West Philadelphia and Gwynn Gaines, Director of VIP Daycare Center, North Philadelphia. Mrs. Kachel, as Instructor & Scholarship Director, School Library & Information Technologies Graduate School, Mansfield University, PA, provided one, as well.
As 2 p.m. approached, Mrs. Malloy taped a red sign reading “BIBLIOTECARIA” (LIBRARIAN in Spanish) to my upper back. The purpose was to make me identifiable to the students from Mastbaum Vo-Tech High School, who had not met me before but were going to stand behind me when I spoke. I thought that if linebackers do it, so could I. They score their goals on the athletic field; I wanted to score ours in the auditorium!
The meeting began; business was tended to. Mrs. Kachel arrived, having driven in from Lancaster County with John Emerick, former Division Chief, School Library Services, PA Department of Education, and Lin Carvell, past president of PSLA, now both retired. Via email I had warned everyone that because the meeting might be long, bring a book/e-reader and a snack. Public testimony began. I had requested to be toward the end of the speakers’ agenda so that my librarian colleagues might have the opportunity to arrive after school, therefore I was number twenty of twenty-two. At some point, we all did read what we had brought along to pass the time.
Eventually, my name was called. "Okay, this is it," I said to those around me. I proceeded to the podium, turned back to look, and had to wait. The whole aisle behind me filled! From babes in mothers' arms to retirees, school library supporters stretched from the podium to the last line of chairs in the back of the auditorium! In addition to the many supporters already mentioned, certified librarians Mildred Cammissa, Ms. Doermann, Ms. Downing, Mrs. Esh, Tamara Friend Essilfie, Ms. Grill, Phyllis Hayes, Mrs. Maiden, Mrs. Malloy (she held up "Dottie" and took the photos), Bani Paul, Brooks Ralston and Mrs. Tatro, Mr. Kintisch and Ms. Sung from ELC, and Mr. Browning from ACTION United helped to fill the aisle.
My three minutes of testimony began. I had not been able to trim an extra minute from the text, so I spoke as fast as I could to still be understood. The yellow light went on for 30 seconds remaining, and then the red light and then the buzzer. I felt empowered by the crowd behind me and just continued to the end. I thought that I wouldn't be stopped with so many people supporting the testimony, and I was correct.
The SRC members then engaged in questioning. Mr. Dworetsky wanted to know how school libraries fit into the Facilities Master Plan. That reply was provided by Dr. Leroy Nunery, Deputy Superintendent and CEO. I handled one question from Dr. Ackerman about electronic readers (a mixed bag for school libraries, I replied), and another from Johnny Irizarry, SRC, about collaborating with public libraries in order to face the realities of current budget constraints. I responded to suggest that a library in the same building with the students was a far superior choice. Both Dr. Nunery and Claudia Averette, Deputy of Administration to the Superintendent, gave me their business cards and requested that I email them, which has been done.



”Dottie”
In the course of Mrs. Malloy's and my travels through the city, one copy of “Dottie” was “borrowed” by PCCY, where a casual observer commented that it depicted “a lawsuit waiting to happen.” The copy viewed by the SRC at the time of testimony is now at the SDP headquarters at 440 North Broad Street, outside Ms. McGee’s office, placed there by Mrs. Nocito, both of whom came to the auditorium for the testimony.

Conclusion
Pages of documentation, dozens of supporters, hundreds of hours, and many miles traveled culminated in the testimony presented to the School Reform Commission on March 9. Hopes for change were high when the crowd behind the podium exited the auditorium and exchanged stories leaving the building. Substantive improvement in equity of access to quality school library programming and ethical and responsible use of digital resources taught by certified librarians remain APSL’s goals for all public school students in Philadelphia.

© Carol W. Heinsdorf





APSL meeting with Ms. Averette
April 8, 2011 2:30 p.m.
2nd floor, 440 North Broad Street

In attendance:
Claudia Averette, Deputy Chief of Administration to the Superintendent
Carol Heinsdorf, APSL President
Francisco Durán, Assistant Superintendent, Promise Academy Office
David Weiner, Associate Superintendent/Chief Academic Officer
Linda Chen, Deputy, Office of Teaching and Learning
Lois McGee, Director of Integrated Instruction
D. William Browning, Legislative/Education Director, ACTION United
Brenda Maiden, President, PA African-American Library Association

Goal: Report progress on APSL proposals (SRC, 3/9/11) to Commissioners and Dr. Ackerman at the 4/13 SRC meeting.
See <http://apsl.wikispaces.com/3-9-2011+SRC+Testimony+%26+docs.>


These are the questions that were posed, and the responses.

1. What has been done to assure that SDP students will continue to benefit in the 2011-2012 academic year from the services of the 65 certified librarians currently employed?

• Mr. Weiner stated that principals have received the Guide to School Budgets, listing sources of funding to "buy" a certified librarian's position, including Title I and desegregation funds.
2.What steps have been taken to target funding for
• a certified librarian in each new and existing Promise Academy that does not have one, and Jackson School
• adequate and current print and digital resources
• clerical help
• professional development for principals in best utilization of the certified librarians and resources

Responses:

Mr. Duran stated that principals can hire a certified librarian "if the funding is there." Smaller schools, he noted, would have smaller budgets.
• There is a new acceptance within the SDP of grant funding for both library staffing and materials acquisition. Current school library grant application efforts were noted. However, staffing grants are difficult to find.
• At Mr.Dworetsky's request, estimates of cost for establishing a library program in both a K-8 and high school had been projected by APSL. That information was shared within the meeting's agenda and is attached.
• Professional development about best use of certified librarians and library programming was discussed. Noted was the initial PD program introduced at the Principals' Academy last August 2010 through Linda Chen with assistance from Lois McGee and Rachelle Nocito. With the positive response, it is recommended that this be a standard offering each year at the August principals' PD.
• There is a chronological gap between the August principals' PD regarding school libraries, and budgeting in January and February. Karen Kolski, assistant regional superintendent, was identified as the person to advise principals in January or February about expectations for school library resources and certified librarians in each building.
• Ms. Averette suggested that librarians share their best practices, as has happened at University City High School under Mr. Duran.

3. How is the District encouraging implementation of library flexible scheduling district-wide--letting students visit the library whenever they need to throughout the day instead of limiting use to regularly scheduled periods?
AND
4. How is the District supporting library instruction co-taught with, and based upon collaboration with, the classroom teacher?
• These can be demonstrated as best practices during principals' meetings in situ, as well as explained during principals' PD.

5. How is the funding being appropriated for library technology?
• The topic of old computer replacement in school libraries was broached but not discussed further.
• The conundrum of laptops versus desktop computers in relation to ease of theft was considered, with no clear answer determined.

6. How are school libraries being integrated into the Facilities Master Plan?
• Mr. Weiner noted that school libraries are desired by participants responding to the FMP survey.
• Researching the Phase I FMP, school libraries placed third at 76%, after computers and technology, as a desired Facilities component, in support of a room identified as the library.
• School libraries were not placed under Educational Programs, which would support a certified librarian teaching in the library.

[Regarding question #7, on 4/11/11 library staff received the Survey Monkey link. As of 4/13/11, no librarian reported that his/her principal had received the link. Principals without school library resources need to answer the survey so that when state money is apportioned to districts for libraries, the SDP receives its share.]
#7. Has the link to the PDE School Library Survey Monkey site been distributed to principals?
• The Survey Monkey link had not been provided to principals as of this Friday afternoon 4/8/11.
• It was stated that Dr. Ackerman never got the link, which was sent to her via PENNLINK on March 29, 2011 from Dr. Amy Morton, PDE.
• Mr. Weiner noted that the technology department is poised to assist with the link.

Supporting information:
PA House Resolution #987 was unanimously passed in October 2010. EVERY SCHOOL in the state is requested to submit survey data about its existing or current school library program, WHETHER IT HAS A LIBRARY OR NOT. The electronic results are expected to be submitted, BY EVERY SCHOOL IN THE STATE, BY FRIDAY, APRIL 22. When every principal submits a paper copy of this survey to the SDP, the answer to the SRC's questions regarding how many schools in the SDP have a library will be answered.

####

The Association of Philadelphia School Librarians is ready to support the above endeavors in the following ways:

1. APSL members willing to host principals' meetings (with their principals' permission) are:
• Janet Malloy--Swenson HS
• Shelly Curran--Olney HS
• Loretta Burton--Central's Barnwell Library
• Brenda Maiden--Carver HS Of Engineering and Science
• Julie Davis--University City High School
• Margaret Bradley--Hill-Freeman Middle School
All have library supportive principals, funding for current resources, and flexible scheduling.

2. APSL is willing to assist with principal PD. Topics suggested at the meeting, but not limited to these, were:
• What will I (principal) get out of this?
• Advantages of flexible scheduling for goals of Imagine 2014
• Librarian/Classroom teacher collaboration

3. APSL, as well as Pennsylvania School Library Association members are willing to submit SDP library survey information from designated individuals as well as principals to Survey Monkey in order to meet the deadline of April 22, 2011. [Deadline has been extended to 4/29/11.]

The questions of targeted funding for certified librarians and current and adequate print and electronic resources, and district-wide academic support for flexible scheduling and teacher collaboration were not answered, other than depending upon grants to provide funding, and principals to decide budget and staff allocations.

New guidelines for PA school libraries were released on Friday. They state the following*:
"The size of a school library’s staff and collection is the best school predictor of academic achievement.
· Students who score higher on standardized tests tend to come from schools with more school library staff and more resources regardless of other factors, including economic ones. PSSA scores tended to increase by 10 to 15 points when all library predictors are maximized.
· The instructional role of the school librarian guides collection development and, in turn, academic achievement.
· School library expenditures affect school library staff and collection size and, in turn, academic achievement.
Principals can do much to make this possible."
*http://pa.webjunction.org/pa-schools/-/articles/content/116007334?_OCLC_ARTICLES_getContentFromWJ=false viewed on 4/10/11.

Authority identification needs to take place in the SDP, where students have suffered through 20 years of budgets eased through de-funding of school libraries and certified librarians. This has led to a situation where principals know how to use neither certified librarians nor library programming to support student learning. The identification of persons in authority over principals has to be addressed by the administration. Librarians will work as hard as they can to serve the students and curriculum, but without the expectation for school library programming voiced by the administrators to the principals, the opportunity to influence our students' academic achievement is lost, and Philadelphia's future is in jeopardy.





Mr. Archie, Ms. Armbrister, Mr. Irizarry, Mr. Dworetsky, and Dr. Ackerman,
I am Carol Heinsdorf, President of the Association of Philadelphia School Librarians, an organization dedicated to advocating for equitable school library programming for SDP students. On March 9, I stood here at the podium and made a practical proposal for beginning to address the school library crisis in the District. The 6-point APSL proposal was supported by 50 advocates who stood behind me that day and was officially endorsed by 19 local, state, and national organizations. At that time, the SRC and Dr. Ackerman responded with great interest and a strong indication of commitment to implementing the six steps we proposed.
The six proposed reforms are very modest and involve maintaining this year's 65 certified librarians for the 2011-2012 school year; targeting funding for certified librarians in the new and existing Promise Academies that do not have them and in Jackson School; implementing flexible scheduling so students can visit the school library when they need to throughout the school day instead of limiting access to regularly scheduled periods; expecting library instruction to be taught in collaboration with classroom teachers; and providing current and adequate technology and print resources.
At Dr. Ackerman's direction, this past Friday I met with five members of the District administration – Ms. Averette, Mr. Weiner, Ms. Chen, Mrs. McGee and Mr. Duran – along with Mr. Browning of ACTION United and Mrs. Maiden of the PA African American Library Association. The District representatives were thoughtful, attuned to the circumstance, forthcoming in responses, and worked in consideration of the issues. The meeting was greatly appreciated.
A detailed summary of the progress made to date on the six APSL proposals is appended to this testimony. In short, the District administration has gathered information about the problems and put some things in place so that school principals have more opportunities to consider each of the six needed reforms. These actions are a good initial step. But as I will explain, much more is needed to actually accomplish the outcomes that everyone seems to share for the libraries in our schools.
The main conclusion that I took from the meeting is that no administrator above the level of school principal currently has the assigned authority to make library decisions and to ensure that any of the six reforms are implemented. There is general agreement about what should happen, and the administration seemed willing to nudge people in the right direction. However, the issue of authority over the six core school library decisions is crucial and needs to be decided. Who is able to inform principals in a decisive manner that these six issues must and will be addressed in each school? Providing mere information to principals is not enough.
For example, APSL has proposed that the District maintain this year's 65 certified librarians for the 2011-2012 school year and that the District target funding for certified librarians in the new and existing Promise Academies that do not have them and in Jackson School. We were told that the District provided information to school principals about how the principals may choose to budget for these. But we were also told that the District has no plans to direct the principals to actually make these decisions.
Not so long ago it was a goal of the SDP to have a library and certified librarian in every public school in Philadelphia. Now many libraries are closed, many are in bad condition, and only 65 certified librarians are left. SDP history shows that about ten percent of certified school librarians across the district are lost each year and library services are cut back or terminated when these decisions are left solely to the principals. The conclusion is obvious – the system of school libraries must be treated as a district-level priority and not left solely to the discretion of individual school principals.
If this history is perpetuated this spring, there will be less than 60 certified librarians left in the District next year; this would violate the first request made by my organization. And regarding APSL's second request, if no one above the level of principal ensures that the Promise Academies hire certified librarians, we know that many of these showcase schools will not operate with the libraries and certified librarians, proven through extensive research to improve students' academic achievement, raise test scores and ensure responsible use of technology. Someone in authority over the principals must take responsibility to direct these choices.
What I am asking for today is that monthly meetings be held between District officials and APSL to make steady progress on the six needed reforms. Most importantly, we should work together to determine the issue of authority over school library decisions at the District and building levels. I also ask for a representative of the SRC to attend these monthly meetings, at least for a while. If the monthly meetings are not productive over time, perhaps as a next step you, the SRC, may need to adopt a resolution guaranteeing implementation of the six basic reforms proposed.
Thank you for your consideration.
Can you give your commitment to ensure that monthly meetings are held to deal with these important issues, to be attended by APSL, District officials, and a representative of the SRC? If you agree, should I work with Ms. Averette to make this happen?

Carol Heinsdorf, President
Association of Philadelphia School Librarians

Dr. Nancy Everhart, President
American Association of School Librarians (AASL)

Eileen Kern, Vice President/President-Elect
Pennsylvania School Library Association (PSLA)

Brenda Maiden, President
Pennsylvania African-American Library Association (PAALA)

Baruch Kintisch, Director of Policy Advocacy
Education Law Center
Philadelphia, PA

Jerry Jordan, President
Philadelphia Federation of Teachers

Brian Armstead, Director of Civic Engagement
Philadelphia Education Fund

D. William Browning Legislative/Education Director
ACTION United
Philadelphia, PA

Thoai Nguyen, Executive Director
SEAMAAC, Inc.
Philadelphia, PA

Edurne Irizarry, Assistant Director
Youth United for Change
Philadelphia, PA

Zac Steele, Director
JUNTOS
Philadelphia, PA

Jennifer Zanck, Education Committee Co-Chair
Passyunk Square Civic Association
Philadelphia, PA

Joyce Valenza, Ph.D.
Springfield, PA

Delia Neuman, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Director of the School Library Media Program
College of Information Science and Technology, Drexel University
Philadelphia, PA

Raymond W. Barber, Ph.D.
Editor, Senior High School Core Collection/Special Consultant
H. W. Wilson Company

Alexia Hudson, MLIS
Reference & Instruction Librarian
Penn State Abington

Keith Curry Lance
Consultant, RSL Research Group
Denver, CO

Jamieson McKenzie, Editor
From Now On - http://fno.org
Bellingham, WA

Pat Kindermann, President
Embracing the Child
Bedford, VA

Joan Sage, Presenter
The Whimsical Sage Read-Aloud
Philadelphia, PA

4/13/2011



APSL meeting with Ms. Averette
June 29, 2011, 1 p.m.
2nd floor, 440 North Broad Street

In attendance:
Claudia Averette, Deputy Chief of Administration to the Superintendent
Thery McKinzie, Executive Director, Secondary Allotments
Carol Heinsdorf, APSL President
Lois McGee, Director of Integrated Instruction
Rachelle Nocito, Content Manager, School Libraries
D. William Browning, Legislative/Education Director, ACTION United
Connie Sung, Education Law Center
William Lin, Intern, Education Law Center
Sylvia Simms, Parent Power founder
Janice Berrian, Community Activist and APSL member


MONEY IS NOT THE ISSUE.
VALUE IS THE ISSUE.
THE SDP HAS NOT VALUED SCHOOL LIBRARY PROGRAMMING IN SUPPORT OF ITS LOW-INCOME STUDENTS' ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT. IF THE SDP HAD VALUED IT, IT WOULD HAVE BEEN/WILL BE FUNDED. CWH

Goal:
Determine, through questions below, how the SDP has met the following proposals presented to the SRC in March, 2011.

Maintain this year’s 65 certified librarians and provide quality school library programs in existing and new Promise Academies and Jackson Elementary School to boost students’ academic accomplishments in accord with Imagine 2014. This action includes:

1. Targeting funding for adequate and current resources and a certified librarian in each school with clerical help

2. Implementing flexible scheduling--letting students visit the library whenever they need to through out the school day, instead of limiting access to regularly scheduled periods*

3. Library instruction to be co-taught and based upon collaboration with the classroom teacher

4. Providing a minimum of 30 library computers less than 4 years old, with Internet access and digital resources to include state-provided ACCESS PA and POWER Library databases

5. Providing a collection of at least 30 library books per student with the annual addition of one book per student in K–8 and .5 books per student in high school

In addition, to follow Mr. Dworetsky's concern--

• Integrate school libraries into the Facilities Master Plan. 


[In the addendums below, the initials before the notes stand for the following:
CS--Connie Sung, ELC
WL--Will Lin, ELC
CWH--Carol Heinsdorf, APSL]

Questions:

What has the SDP done to maintain the positions of the 2011-2012 certified librarians? [Refer to supporting documentation below.]
WL-- It is unclear whether or not retirements will be filled. We will not know until the "dust has settled" after layoffs and restructuring. In any case, it seems unlikely that all of these positions will be filled by certified librarians, since hiring a certified librarian is up to the discretion of principals, who are more likely to hire LIMAs to save money.
 Do schools need a functioning library program and/or a certified librarian to meet accreditation requirements?
CWH-answer, with link provided by J.S. Malloy

STANDARD 12: INFORMATION RESOURCES AND TECHNOLOGY
The Standard: Information resources, materials, and technology are accessible and of adequate scope, quantity, and quality to facilitate the school’s pursuit of its total educational program. These resources encourage all students and staff to broaden and extend their knowledge and skills. Access to appropriate information resources and technology is provided for students and staff. Appropriate instruction is offered to develop student and staff inquiry, research, and information literacy skills. Information technology equipment is functional and well maintained.
Middle States Standards for Accreditation for Schools (2009) Page 34


• What steps has the SDP taken to insure that positions vacated by retirement have remained open?
CWH--Not known 


• Who can provide correct information regarding school library position and location changes?
CWH--Ms. Averette agreed that this information was hard to track down and implied that it would be corrected. 


• How has the SDP insured that principals know the distinction between the roles, skills, and academic preparation of certified school librarians and LIMAs (clerks)? New guidelines for PA school libraries were released recently. They state, "School library expenditures affect school library staff and collection size and, in turn, academic achievement. Principals can do much to make this possible."
*http://pa.webjunction.org/pa-schools/-/articles/content/116007334?_OCLC_ARTICLES_getContentFromWJ=false viewed on 4/10/11.

C.S.--SDP official documentation needed for principals to help them understand the roles and skills of school librarians and LIMAs. 
Need clear job descriptions defining differences between certified librarians and LIMAs.
Who is going to educate the principals?
WL-- How do we educate principals about the differences between LIMAs and certified librarians?


• LIMAs picked new locations on Thursday, June 23. Several were Promise Academy high schools. Are clerks perceived as the best first choice for academic achievement in Promise Academy high schools?
WL--Is a mandate possible to ensure that Renaissance schools have functioning library programs with certified librarians? 


• It is important that educated, tax-paying citizens maintain their jobs, which has happened with the LIMAs. However, if no new positions have been created, musical chairs is being played with students' academic futures--taking from some, giving to others. How does the SDP see this as an advantage for students?


• How are school library programs being actively integrated into the Facilities Master Plan?
C.S.-- Deputy for Strategic Initiatives, Danielle Floyd, is heading up the District’s facilities master planning process. Says libraries are included in School Performance Index.


• Who is directing principals to provide funding for current and adequate school library resources, both digital and print, as well as current hardware?
• CWH--Ms. Averette suggested that library services in place in a school could be part of the observation of a principal's performance.
• WL--Can we incorporate assessment and observation of library programs into principal performance evaluations? This might motivate principals to "value" libraries more and make room in their budgets for more library funding. Assistant superintendents are the ones who perform these evaluations; what can the District do to make this happen?


• Who is taking Lois McGee's place? Is this person school library oriented? Will this person educate principals to flexible scheduling and classroom teacher/librarian collaboration?


C.S.-- Need to confirm:

Masch’s budget guidelines (school of 1000+ students requires a LIMA)
CWH--confirmed: How to Meet the Mandate-- "If your school enrollment is projected to be 1,000 or greater you must budget for at least a LIMA." 11-05-03-FY2011-12-SDP-Budget-Detail.pdf--p. 480.

• No certified librarian laid off for 2011-12?; is there anyone to replace retirees?
CWH--To be confirmed, or not, at meeting with Ms. Averette in September 2011.


• Libraries and librarians to be an academic line item through the reorganization; will someone with librarian experience be in the Office of Curriculum for the 2011-2012 school year?

CWH--Linda Chen replied that school libraries are an academic resource.


• Someone with experience as a librarian to be consulted for input on the design of libraries in new/refurbished/renovated buildings?

Future goals:
• Adjust the minimum requirements for having a librarian in a school (talk to CASA, PFT?) 

CWH--Mr. Jordan, PFT President, was emailed immediately after this meeting with the information that the time is now right for this item to be in contract negotiation for the next upcoming contract. Ms. Averette [?] can engage CASA in time for principals' PD in August?

• Make library usage part of principal evaluations


• Recruit new librarians to apply to SDP


Authority identification needs to take place in the SDP, where students have suffered through 20 years of budgets eased through de-funding of school libraries and certified librarians. This has led to a situation where principals know how to use neither certified librarians nor library programming to support student learning. The identification of persons in authority over principals has to be addressed by the administration. Librarians will work as hard as they can to serve the students and curriculum, but without the expectation for school library programming voiced by the administrators to the principals, the opportunity to influence our students' academic achievement is lost, and Philadelphia's future is in jeopardy.

Suggested reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2011/06/26/are-school-librarians-expendable/school-librarians-assessing-the-unassessable

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/25/nyregion/schools-eliminating-librarians-as-budgets-shrink.html


Association of Philadelphia School Librarians
Changes in SDP School Library Programming for 2011-2012
[as reported to APSL by library staffers notified of these changes]

Aggregated Data 6/29/11

[Note: This information can change on a day-to-day basis. For example, the LIMAs selected new positions before 6/29/11. All were placed in LIMA positions, although the students in the schools from which they transferred now will no longer have their services.]

CERTIFIED LIBRARIAN positions lost for 2011-2012: 15 of 66 (23%)

Content Manager lost

High Schools: 8 positions lost

Elementary (though gr. 8, inc. MS): 6 positions lost

Certified librarians' seniority dates: 11/74; 2/80; 12/80; 11/85; 2/86; 9/86; 9/87; 9/90; 9/90; 9/91; 9/91; 9/92; 11/93; 10/95; 9/08

Projected fate of library programs with certified librarians:

High schools--
• Certified librarian to be replaced with LIMA--1
• Closed--1
• Charter-ized HS--1
• Promise Academy--now on vacancy list
• Question marks--4

Elementary schools--
• Replaced by reading specialist--1
• No staff--used for corrective classes--1
• Closed--1
• Question marks--3

LIMA positions lost for 2011-2012: 9 of 26 (35%) NOTE: ALL DISPLACED LIMAs SELECTED LIMA POSITIONS AT THE END OF JUNE, 2011.

High Schools: 1 position lost

Elementary (though gr. 8, inc. MS): 7 positions lost, plus position of one more FT LIMA who served in two different schools

LIMAs' seniority dates: 3/73; 12/80; 10/87; 1/07; 9/08; 9/08; 11/08; 11/08


Projected fate of library programs with LIMAs:
• High School--Question mark

Elementary (though gr. 8, inc. MS):
• Position deleted due to requirement of 1000 students for library to be staffed--Library used as authorized by principal--Teachers will process [meaning to check out?] library materials for individual classes--1
• No books borrowed--1
• "Used for whatever"--1
• Volunteer staff person--1
• Replaced by SSA or closed--1
• Question marks--3

Promise Academies currently with certified librarians:

Potter-Thomas ES
Clemente MS
Germantown HS--on vacancy list
Southern HS--on vacancy list
University City HS

Promise Academies currently without certified librarians, but on vacancy list:

Alcorn--on vacancy list
King HS--on vacancy list
Sayre HS--on vacancy list
West HS--on vacancy list

Promise Academies currently without certified librarians, NOT on vacancy list:

Barry
Pennell
W.D. Kelley
Ethel Allen
Dunbar
FitzSimons HS
Vaux




High Schools with certified librarians, 2010-2011; some on vacancy list for 2011-2012:

Palumbo
Central
Dobbins
Edison
Carver
Fels--vacancy list
Frankford
Franklin Learning Center--vacancy list--FILLED
B. Franklin
Germantown--vacancy list
Girls
Gratz
King--vacancy list
Lincoln
Mastbaum
Masterman
Northeast
Overbrook
Roxborough
Sayre--vacancy list
South--vacancy list
Strawberry Mansion
University City
Washington
West--vacancy list
Youth Study Center


2010-2011, schools with certified librarians:
High Schools--25 of 61
Elementary Schools (K-8, inc. MS)--40 of 204

Carol Heinsdorf, President
cheinsdorf at gmail.com